Main menu

   

Next IUGG General Assembly Montreal, Canada
(July 8-19, 2019)

835 days left

 
Flag Counter

Joint inter-association symposia

 

QUICK NAVIGATION
(click the symposia type shortcut)
JA     |     JC     |     JG     |     JH
    |     JM     |     JP     |     JS     |     JV     

  

JA1 Joint Inversion and Mutually Constrained Inversion of Geophysical Observations (IAGA, IAG, IASPEI)

Convener: Oliver Ritter, Potsdam, Germany (IAGA)

Co-conveners: Pavel Novak, Plzen, Czech Republic (IAG); Malcolm Sambridge, Canberra, Australia (IASPEI); Max Moorkamp, Leicester, U.K. (IAGA)

Description

We invite contributions on novel inversion methods with application across the geosciences. Of particular interest are 3D imaging, joint inversion of geodetic, geophysical and geochemical datasets, and multi-disciplinary interpretation approaches such as integration of gravity, EM and seismic data or thermo-mechanical modelling studies constrained by physical parameters.
State-of-the-art geophysical inversions are typically non-unique, suffer from poorly constrained or low sensitivity model domains, sometimes in agreement with, more often ignoring geological, other geophysical or geochemical a priori information. The additional information gained from multi-method inversions of a single physical parameter (such as in seismic imaging and tomographic inversion or full waveform inversion approaches) or combined multi-physics inversion approaches (e.g. by combining mass density, electrical conductivity and elastic properties) may eventually lead to more consistent information on structure and processes present in the subsurface. Constrained joint inversions may also enhance our way of imaging temporal changes at depth, both in the long term (e.g. for understanding the physics of geodynamic processes) or in short term (e.g. fluctuations caused by geotechnical installations such as enhanced hydrocarbon recovery or geothermal systems).
We encourage papers on methodological and numerical advances for geophysical inverse modelling. Contributions demonstrating applicability of joint or constraint inversion approaches with real data are particularly welcome.

This symposium will follow up on Union Symposium U6.

go to top of the page


JA2 Modelling of Space Weather Effects: Solar, Magnetospheric and Earth Resistivity Constraints (IAGA, IAMAS)

Convener: Alan Thomson, Edinburgh, U.K. (IAGA)

Co-conveners: Larisa Trichtchenko, Ottawa, Canada (IAGA)

Description

Space weather has the potential to impact many modern technologies, such as spacecraft, satellite operations, communications, aircraft and power grids. Examples of relatively recent major space weather events, with known impacts, include the severe magnetic storms of 1989 and 2003. Understanding, modelling and predicting the extent to which space weather can affect systems draws on skills from across many scientific disciplines, requiring input from both space and Earth scientists. In this symposium we welcome contributions on all aspects of the modelling of space weather and its effects, from the Sun to Earth. This includes the modelling of the various interactions between travelling solar storms and the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere and solid Earth and the validation of models through measurements. Contributions on models developed to aid end-users, such as satellite and power grid operators, survive the impact of space weather are also encouraged.

go to top of the page


JA3 Geophysical Constraints on Geodynamical Processes (IAGA, SEDI, IASPEI, IAVCEI)

Convener: Catherine Constable, San Diego, USA (IAGA)

Co-conveners: George Helffrich, Bristol, U.K. (SEDI); Gregory Housemann, Leeds, UK (IASPEI)

Description

Over the past decade developments in understanding of the physical properties of Earth’s deep interior derived from theory, laboratory experiments, and ab initio calculations have led to updated views on many properties including core composition, electrical conductivity (with associated impacts on both thermal and electrical diffusion), and the presence of post-perovskite phase in parts of the lowermost mantle. Seismic observations and modeling have contributed to sharper images of structure and composition of the lower mantle, and revealed complexities in inner core structure. Discussions have arisen about whether conditions at the top or the bottom of the outer core provide the dominant control on the geodynamo. Updated paleomagnetic data and field models indicate that the influence of lateral variations in structure at the core-mantle or inner-core boundary is detectable in both average geomagnetic field and its regional variability. There is debate about the existence and extent of stratification in the outer core and concerning the composition and structure of features contributing to LLSVPs and ULVZs in the lowermost mantle. This symposium welcomes contributions that explore the consequences of such updated geophysical constraints for geodynamical processes in both core and mantle.

go to top of the page


JA4 Results from SWARM, Ground Based Data and Earlier Satellite Missions - Recognition of Eigil Friis-Christensen (IAGA, IAG, IAMAS)

Convener: Nils Olsen, Lyngby, Denmark (IAGA)

Co-conveners: Claudia Stolle, Potsdam, Germany (IAGA); Rune Floberghagen, Frascati, Italy (IAG)

Description

Swarm, a constellation mission comprising three identical satellites to study the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system, has been launched on 22 November 2013. Aiming at performing the best ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution, Swarm continues and improves the geophysical observations that have been taken by the satellites Ørsted, CHAMP and SAC-C during the last decade.
Each of the three Swarm satellites makes high-precision and high-resolution measurements of the strength, direction and variation of the magnetic field, complemented by precise navigation, accelerometer, plasma and electric field measurements. Two satellites fly side-by-side with at an initial altitude of 460 km (lowering over the coming years), thereby measuring the East-West gradient of the magnetic and gravitational field, while the third satellite is at a higher altitude.
This session solicits contributions about first scientific results from the mission in terms of data analyses and Earth science applications, both regarding the Earth’s intrinsic magnetic field, its gravity field and their interaction with the Earth environment; and (2) combination and synergies of Swarm and other satellites like Ørsted, CHAMP, GOCE, CLUSTER as well as ground data, targeting on providing a comprehensive description of the Earth system.

go to top of the page


JA5 Physical Processes Prior to and During Earthquakes, Reliability of Precursors (IAGA, IASPEI, IAVCEI)

Convener: Elvira Astafyeva, Paris, France (IAGA)

Co-conveners: Jacques Zlotnicki, Clermont Ferrand, France (IAVCEI), George Balasis, Athens, Greece (IAGA); Jan Blecki, Warsaw, Polad (IAGA); Malcolm Johnston, Menlo Park, USA (IASPEI); Valerio Tramutoli, Potenza, Italy (IASPEI); Takeshi Hashimoto, Sapporo, Japan (IAVCEI)

Description

Earthquakes are natural hazards resulting in a sudden energy release from the Earth’s crust. Earthquakes might generate pre-seismic to co-seismic signals, on land, in the atmosphere, and in the ionosphere and in electro-magnetic parameters. In particular, pre-seismic effects (in TEC, GPS, EM field, hydrology, geochemistry, atmospheric conditions, etc.) can be observed because preparatory processes can be initiated some time before earthquakes in the vicinity of the future epicenter.
In turn, co-seismic disturbances are triggered by earthquakes themselves, i.e. by displacements of the ground, propagation of seismic waves and acoustic resonance. Large submarine earthquakes can cause outsized tsunamis, which can induce perturbations in the atmosphere and ionosphere.
The symposium will focus on (1) All kinds of evidences of precursory phenomena, involving seismic, geodetic, geochemical, hydrological, in addition to electromagnetic anomalies, and their inter-relationships, (2) Theoretical models and laboratory experiments to explain the physical mechanisms behind earthquakes generation and precursory phenomena, and (3) Study of various data bases with new procedures (e.g. critical approach), (4) Study of ionospheric response to earthquakes and tsunami propagation
Multi-instrumental ground-based and/or space-borne studies are particularly welcome. Multi-scale time series analysis and their cross-correlations are encouraged. Studies on the relationships between tectonics and volcanic activity are promoted. Discussions on the reliability of earthquakes on long and short-term precursors are also warmly welcome.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Oscar Yang (Pasadena, USA), Vincenzo Lapenna (Potenza, Italy)

go to top of the page


JA6 Data on the Edge: Preservation and Utilization of Historical Data in the Geosciences (IAGA, IASPEI, IAMAS, IAG, IAHS, IACS)

Convener: Edward W. Cliver, Sunspot, USA (IAGA)

Co-conveners: József Adám, Budapest, Hungary (IAG); Josep Batllo, Lisbon, Portugal (IASPEI); Maurice Ertsen, Delft, The Netherlands (IAHS); Bruce Raup, Boulder, USA (IACS), Kris Harper, Tallahassee, USA (IAMAS)

Description

Reanalysis of old geophysical/geodetical data in the light of our present knowledge has become an important tool for understanding topics such  as solar variability, climatic change, tectonics, earth rotation, and extreme natural events (e.g., magnetic storms, hurricanes, rainfall, floods, earthquakes). This symposium has two foci: (a) Locating, assessing, preserving, and disseminating historical data such as polar motion, time and temperature measurements, magnetograms, seismograms, glacier extent, and tide gauge records. (b) Using historical data to advance our understanding of the Earth.

Contributions dealing with similar subjects will be presented also in the related Union symposia U4 Data Science and Analytics in Geodesy and Geophysics - Research and Education Progress and Opportunities; U9 Revolutions in Earth Sciences: from Different Spheres to a Common Globe.

go to top of the page


JC1 Sea Ice in the Arctic and Southern Oceans (IACS, IAMAS, IAPSO)

Convener: Hiroyuki Enomoto, Tokyo, Japan (IACS)

Co-conveners: Matti Leppäranta, Helsinki, Finland (IACS); Goran Bjork, Goteborg, Sweden (IAPSO); Alexey Marchenko, Longyearbyen, Norway (IAPSO)

Description

Polar sea ice is of strong concern as the outcome of changes in the polar environment and driving oceanic forces. Recent observations show significant sea-ice reduction in the Arctic but, in contrast, increase in the Antarctic. Sea ice conditions in sub-polar regions are showing associated fluctuations in place and time. Seasonal sequences and regional variations are the key components to assess the changing sea ice conditions. Sea ice thinning in the Arctic causes more breakable, dynamic and hence quickly changeable sea ice conditions, wave action of drifting ice becomes more important. These predicted sea ice conditions would intensify ice–ocean and ice–atmosphere interactions through momentum, heat and salt transfers.
Oceanic and atmospheric conditions have been investigated to understand causes and processes of sea-ice changes. Oceanic circulation transport in the Arctic and Southern Oceans is a highly interested issue to understand sea ice and related polar climate changes. Increasing ice free area and period in the Arctic Ocean can enhance acidification.
This symposium will encompass aspects of sea ice and related oceanic conditions in the Arctic and Southern Oceans. Furthermore, this symposium encourages presentations of projected changes in sea ice conditions under changing climate conditions. Chemical and biological aspects of the polar oceans with changing sea ice conditions are also welcome. Finally, this symposium aims to provide opportunities to connect sea ice and oceanic investigations based on field data, remote sensing and modelling.

go to top of the page


JC2 Impact of Climate Warming on High-Latitude and High-Altitude Hydro- and Cryosphere (IACS, IAHS/ICSIH, IAMAS)

Convener: Charles Fierz, Davos, Switzerland (IACS)

Co-conveners: Wolfgang Schoener, Vienna, Austria (IAMAS); Danny Marks, Boise, USA (IAHS/ICSIH); Tobias Jonas, Davos, Switzerland (IAHS/ICSIH)

Description

At both high latitudes and high altitudes, impact of climate change on the cryosphere is intimately linked to that on the hydrosphere. Snow and ice melt constitute highly relevant components of the annual hydrological cycle. Being able to predict the amount and timing of meltwater is therefore important for managing water resources and preventing natural hazards both today and in the future. Moreover, the interplay of cryo-, hydro, and atmosphere in mountainous regions, but also at high latitudes, gains increasing attention. For example, internal accumulation due to refreezing is a key uncertainty of firn and mass balances of snow and ice covered areas and not fully understood yet. This joint Symposium will focus on advances in the coupled cryo-hydro-atmosphere, including process understanding, observational advances, model development and validation, applications, climate change impacts and projections under a changing climate.  Ecological implications of changing cryo- and hydrospheres are also welcome.

go to top of the page


JG1 Dynamics of the Cryosphere from Geometric and Gravimetric Observations (IAG, IACS)

Convener: Mirko Scheinert, Dresden, Germany (IAG)

Co-conveners: Pippa Whitehouse, Durham, UK (IACS); Matt King, Hobart, Australia (IAG); Erik Ivins, Pasadena, USA (IAG)

Description

The cryosphere is undergoing huge changes, and multidisciplinary studies offer the best approach to understand its past, current and future state. Geodesy provides an array of observational tools that operate across a spectrum of spatial scales: from the enormous areal extent of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets down to flow features within individual glaciers. Satellite methods play key roles: radar and laser altimetry enable us to infer height changes of the ice surface, radar interferometry and feature tracking allow monitoring of glacial flux, while satellite gravimetry provides a direct measurement of ice-mass changes. Independently, GNSS observations of crustal deformation reflect the loading effects of past and present ice-mass changes and provide constraints to disentangle ice-mass effects from solid earth effects in satellite altimetry and gravimetry. Furthermore, ground-based and airborne methods provide important spatial and temporal densification and calibration/validation of satellite measurements.
In recent years, our understanding of glacier, ice cap and ice sheet behaviour has advanced through a variety of synergistic combinations of geodetic methods with geological, geophysical and glaciological observation techniques. In particular, modeling efforts that are validated by geodetic data improve our understanding of the mechanisms and processes driving ice dynamics. In addition, the modeling of glacial-isostatic adjustment is of central importance to making reliable estimates of ice-mass balance by satellite gravimetry, especially in Antarctica.
For this symposium, contributions are sought on all aspects of space-, air- and ground-based geodesy applied to cryosphere studies, from individual glaciers to entire ice sheets. We particularly welcome the interdisciplinary use of a variety of observational techniques to understand the stability and evolution of the cryosphere and test numerical models. We hope that this symposium will present a detailed but also comprehensive picture of the dynamic state of the cryosphere, from ice sheets to individual glaciers.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Anthony Memin (Valbonne, France), Brian Gunter (Atlanta, USA), Veit Helm (Bremerhaven, Germany)

go to top of the page


JG2 Modelling the Atmosphere and Ionosphere by Space Measurements (IAG, IAGA, IAMAS)

Convener: Marcelo Santos, New Brunswick, Canada (IAG)

Co-conveners: Hanli Liu, Boulder, USA (IAGA), Jens Wickert, Potsdam, Germany (IAG)

Description

Space measurements of various types play a fundamental role in our growing understanding of the various processes in the Earth’s atmosphere, especially the coupling of its different layers. The different disciplines of geodesy, aeronomy, geomagnetism and meteorology contribute and benefit in a multi-disciplinary way. They involve observing satellite systems, whether dedicated or not, and the development and application of models and techniques to treat, assimilate, represent and interpret those measurements.
We encourage the submission of papers dealing with methodology, applications, as well as with inter-comparisons and validation. They include the assessment, validation and discussion of current and future satellite systems; the modelling of atmospheric corrections for geodesy; GNSS-based atmospheric sounding; advancements in the modelling of the atmosphere, including tomographic techniques; modelling and interpretation and modeling of space weather and its coupling with the terrestrial weather; assimilation of measurements into numerical models; and use of long-term space-based monitoring and numerical models for a variety of applications, including terrestrial and space climate. We accept contributions dealing with global and regional scales.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Hermann Luehr (Potsdam, Germany), Manfred Ern (Julich, Germany), Johannes Böhm (Vienna, Austria),

go to top of the page


JG3 Variations of the Hydrosphere from Satellite Gravity Missions (IAG, IAHS)

Convener: Roland Pail, München, Germany (IAG)

Co-conveners: Frédérique Seyler, Cayenne, French Guiana (IAHS); Walter Collischoon, Porto Alegre, Brasil (IAHS), Stephane Calmant, Toulouse, France (IAG); James J. Butler, Lawrence, USA (IAHS)

Description

Since 2000, the number of Earth Observation (E/O) space-borne sensors has increased tenfold and 267 E/O satellites are projected to be launched over the next decade (from Euroconsult report http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/).In the domain of hydrology and water resources monitoring, numerous studies have shown the ability of these new sensors to retrieve measurements and estimations on every compartment of the hydrological cycle: water stage, river discharge and floodplain dynamics by altimetry, precipitation estimates, groundwater stock variations by gravimetry, soil wetness, evapotranspiration. It is time to draw a synthesis on the data and methods, comparing the datasets, cross-validating the results of different missions. It is time also to evaluate how the community of hydrological sciences and water managers are using these data, and how they can be mixed with in situ data or in some cases overcome their lack.
Another goal of this symposium will be to evaluate the potential of this new datasets for estimating the scale-dependent variability of the hydrological systems as well as the measurements uncertainties and their distribution in space and time. This topic is relevant for the Panta Rhei decade announced by IAHS and it is expected that observation from space can help answer many questions in this area.
Last, the technological revolution of space observation concerns about 50 countries in the world. It is really important to consider now how these data, tools, methods and knowledge can be shared as much as possible with the countries that most need to know the state of their natural resources and how they are threatened by global changes, and often those who have the least access to space technology.

go to top of the page


JH1 Extreme Hydrological Events (IAHS, IACS, IAG)

Convener: Christophe Cudennec, Rennes, France (IAHS)

Co-conveners: Annette Eicker, Bonn, Germany (IAG), Paul Pilon, Geneva, Switzerland (WMO), Markus Stoffel, Geneva, Switzerland (IACS), Alberto Viglione, Vienna, Austria (IAHS), Zongxue Xu, Beijing, China (IAHS), Xuebin Zhang, Toronto, Canada (IAMAS)

Description

Extreme hydrological events develop at the Earth’s surface with low frequency and high magnitude. They are often driven by closely connected causal forces from other aspects of geophysics, such as meteorological, oceanographic, and seismological. They are often complex in terms of the distribution of water over time and space, its phases and its impacts on storages. They also often develop over the interfaces of liquid freshwater with marine, atmospheric, icy and snowy solid, and ground waters. There is also a large influence of such events with human and physical geographies, in terms of feedback and feedforward process interactions, particularly in the areas of disaster risk management, disaster mitigation and prevention.
Contributions are welcome on
 - the assessment, measurement, understanding, modelling, forecasting, prediction and management of extreme hydrological events;
 -particular focus on complexity, geophysical interfaces, science-society interactions;
 - new direct and indirect technologies, from particular observation techniques to modelling or statistical approaches;
 - contributions from other disciplines dealing with such extremes;
 - the challenge of these issues in the context of climate change;
 - conceptual advances regarding the concepts of the Anthropocene and the dimensions of Water Security,
 - tropical storms, heavy precipitation and floods under the “Grand Challenges” of the World Climate Research Programme.

This symposium will follow up on Union Symposium U2.
 
Note:
Abstract submission deadline - November 16, 2014
To be pre-published in Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences* (read more)

go to top of the page


JH3 Assessment of Climate and Anthropogenic Changes Impacts on the Terrestrial Hydrosphere (IAHS, IAMAS)

Convener: Alberto Montanari, Bologna, Italy (IAHS/IAMAS)

Co-conveners: Yangbo Chen, Guanzhou, China (IAHS); Siegfried Demuth, Paris, France (UNESCO); Harald Kunstmann, Augsburg, Germany (IAHS); Makoto Taniguchi, Tokyo, Japan (CCEC)

Description

Environmental change is a reason of both highly relevant societal and scientific concern as it is occurring at an unprecedented pace and might impact the frequency and magnitude of natural hazards and change the spatiotemporal distribution of terrestrial water availability. Environmental change is induced by direct anthropogenic impact as well as climate variability, which interact each other with complex system dynamics. Coping with environmental change requires in particular advanced impact analyses and improved prediction methods to support stake holders and policy makers in water resources management and natural hazards mitigation. Advanced prediction methods should be based on improved understanding and modelling of the hydrological interactions and feedbacks between the atmosphere, the land surface and subsurface and finally with the society. This symposium will focus on the assessment of climate and anthropogenic impacts on the terrestrial hydrosphere. Contributions dealing with climate impact assessment methods, regionalization techniques, compartment crossing coupled model systems, prediction of future design variables under change, non-stationarity, surface water and groundwater dynamics under anthropogenic impact, socio-hydrology, and modelling of human-impacted hydrological systems are welcome.

go to top of the page 


JM1 Earth Systems Dynamics, Predictability and Probabilistic Forecasting (IAMAS, IAG, IAGA, IAPSO, IASPEI)

Convener: Tim Woollings, Oxford, U.K. (IAMAS)

Co-conveners: Nico Sneeuw, Stuttgart, Germany (IAG), Matthias Holschneider, Potsdam, Germany (IAGA), Gordon Swaters, Edmonton, Canada (IAPSO), Yehuda Bon-Zion, Los Angeles, USA (IASPEI), Adam Scaife, Exeter, U.K. (IAMAS), Istvan Szunyough, College Station, USA (IAMAS)

Description

The symposium deals with mathematical and numerical applications to determine the dynamics of geophysical spheres. For the atmosphere one focus will be on the dynamics and predictability of large scale atmospheric circulation, in particular on monthly to decadal timescales. Contributions are welcome on theory, observations and/or modelling of the fundamental dynamics of flow anomalies such as persistent regimes and teleconnections, in particular when this pertains to their predictability. Studies could identify drivers of circulation anomalies (such as stratospheric, tropical, ocean or cryosphere influences), assess potential predictability or assess/develop systems for sub-seasonal to decadal prediction.
Ensemble modelling techniques are increasingly important for predicting the probabilities of weather events at both longer timescales and at smaller space scales than can be reliably predicted by single deterministic model simulations. A key technique in representing model uncertainties is the stochastic representation of unresolved processes. All earth-system models represent filtered states, and the distribution of future filtered states, given the current state, is fundamentally stochastic. Contributions are welcome both on stochastic and ensemble modelling techniques and also on the use of TIGGE and other datasets to evaluate the performance of ensemble prediction systems.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Richard Greatbatch (Kiel, Germany)

go to top of the page


JM2 Climate Variability and Earth Systems Modelling (IAMAS, IAPSO, IACS, IAGA)

Convener: Hisashi Nakamura, Tokyo, Japan (IAMAS)

Co-conveners: Robert Marsh, Southampton, U.K. (IAPSO), Philippe Huybrechts, Brussels, Belgium (IACS), Scott Hosking, Cambridge, U.K. (IAMAS), Thomas Lachlan-Cope, Cambridge, U.K. (IAMAS), Shang-Ping Xie, San Diego, USA (IAPSO), Bo Qiu, Honolulu, USA (IAPSO)

Description

It is well established that tropical atmosphere-ocean coupled variability such as ENSO exerts climatic impacts that extend into the extra-tropics.  Resulting atmospheric teleconnections can drive changes in air-sea exchanges of heat, moisture and momentum over extensive maritime domains. However, recent studies suggest that the extra-tropical ocean can also feedback on the overlying atmosphere on various spatio-temporal scales, particularly long-term variability of the western boundary currents, associated frontal zones, marginal seas and snow/ice cover, including cloud/precipitation systems, cyclone development and stormtrack/jetstream formation. The reduction of the September minimum Arctic sea-ice extent by over 10% per decade has attracted much attention. In contrast, Antarctic sea-ice extent has experienced a small increase in recent years, which has been investigated in relation to atmospheric circulation changes associated with tropical forcing and stratospheric ozone depletion.  Meanwhile, spring snow cover extent over the Northern Hemisphere has experienced an accelerated rate of decrease over the last 40 years. Stratospheric variability has also been linked to surface interaction, and in turn contributes to tropospheric teleconnections. It has thus become increasingly important to study climate variability and change from a viewpoint of the coupled climate system that includes the hydrosphere (oceans) and cryosphere as well as the troposphere and stratosphere.
We invite contributions on topics including, but not limited to: theoretical, observational and/or modeling studies on the coupling processes in weather and climate; impacts of ocean and/or cryosphere variability on the troposphere and stratosphere at various scales (meso-, hemispheric scales); and/or the response of the ocean and/or cryosphere to the multi-scale tropospheric and stratospheric variability.

go to top of the page


JM3 Geochemical Processes and Cycles (IAMAS, IAVCEI, IAHS, IAPSO, IACS)

Convener: John Burrows, Bremen, Germany (IAMAS)

Co-conveners: Frank Dentener, Ispra, Italy (IAMAS), Laura Gallardo, Santiago, Chile (IAMAS), Anne Thompson, Greenbelt, USA (IAMAS), Kate Heal, Edinburgh, U.K. (IAHS)

Description

With increasing global population – more than half of whom live in cities – and rapid increasing industrialization, the potential for changes in the Earth's atmosphere has never been higher. The complex web of processes that control the state of the atmosphere and the quality of the air we breathe demands careful and continued study through theory, models and observations. Central to these is the study of the chemical state of the atmosphere and a continued development and understanding of the relationship between atmospheric chemistry and the many other Earth systems both physical and social. For example, links between atmospheric pollution and health are becoming well established.
Also the link to policy needs is another theme.
This session will be showcase observations, models and theoretical studies covering the full gamut of the atmospheric chemical system from ice to fires and from the micro to planetary scale. Papers emphasizing linkages between atmospheric chemistry and other Earth systems as volcanoes, oceans and ice shields are particularly welcome.

go to top of the page


JM4 Data Assimilation in Geophysical Sciences (IAMAS, IAGA, IACS, IASPEI, IAPSO, IAG)

Convener: William Lahoz, Kjeller, Norway (IAMAS)

Co-conveners: Alexandre Fournier, Paris, France (IAGA), Richard Essery, Edinburgh, U.K. (IACS), Remy Bossu, Paris, France (IASPEI), Konstantin Belyaev, Moscom, Russia (IAPSO), Han Shin-Chan, Greenbelt, USA (IAG), Craig Bishop, Monterey, USA (IAMAS), Tomoko Matsuo, Boulder, USA (IAGA), Jeffrey Walker, Melbourne, Australia (IAMAS), Laurent Bertino, Bergen, Norway (IAPSO), Ian Fenty, Boston, USA (IAPSO)

Description

Data assimilation integrates the wealth of data from both satellite and in situ platforms to analyse the current and past state of the various elements of the Earth System, such as the atmosphere, the ionosphere, the ocean, the land and the cryosphere, forming the basis of improved forecasts from the mesoscale to the global scale. Data assimilation also plays a key role in efforts to couple the various elements of the Earth System, and benefit from proper account of the interactions between the elements of the Earth System. A key issue is the characterization of the uncertainty in past, current and future state estimates in both coarse and high resolution models.
The symposium provides a forum for presentation and discussion of the latest research in data assimilation across the elements of the Earth System. There will be a focus on three developments:
(i) characterization of errors;
(ii) application of data assimilation techniques to coupled elements of the Earth System;
(iii) extension of data assimilation activities to smaller spatial scales, notably for participatory sensing involving air quality and weather observations.
We are therefore calling for presentations on data assimilation that focus on any of these three developments from both operational environments as well as explorative research applications. 

This symposium will follow up on Union Symposium U6.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Peter Jan van Leeuwen (Reading, U.K.), Marc Bocquet (Marne la Vallée, France)

go to top of the page


JP1 Sea Level Change and Variability: Past, Present and Future (IAPSO, IAG, IACS)

Convener: Gary T. Mitchum, St. Petersburg, USA (IAPSO)

Co-conveners: Philip Woodworth, Liverpool, UK (IAPSO); C.K. Shum, Columbus, USA (IAG); Andrew Mackintosh, Wellington, New Zealand (IACS)

Description

Sea level rise is one of the most important consequences of climate change and is of great interest to scientists and the public alike. It is a topic that spans many science disciplines (oceanography, geodesy, cryosphere, solid Earth, hydrology and atmosphere) as well as practical issues such as coastal engineering and planning, for potential sustainability to address coastal vulnerability. In this symposium we invite contributions from any area of sea-level science which will provide information on the variability and long-term change in sea level, in the past, present or future, and either regionally or globally. We are interested in both observations and model/reconstruction studies of sea level change, and also in advances in the techniques used to measure and model sea level and the many geophysical and anthropogenic processes which contribute to it. New findings on the impacts of rising sea levels on coastal infrastructure and communities will also be welcome. The symposium will complement and continue Union Symposium U10 by providing a wider forum for presentations of the many aspects of this important topic.

This symposium will follow up on Union Symposium U10.

go to top of the page


JP2 The Potential for Carbon- and Climate-Engineering to Offset Global Change (IAPSO, IAMAS)

Convener: Tim Kruger, Oxford, U.K. (IAPSO)

Co-conveners: Ben Kravitz, Richland, USA (IAMAS); Mike MacCracken, Washington, USA (IAMAS)

Description

With the pace of climate change increasing and the array and magnitude of climate impacts intensifying, increasing attention is being paid to the potential for offsetting the effects of anthropogenic climate change through large-scale technical means, often called geoengineering. Possible approaches include carbon engineering (e.g., enhancing terrestrial or oceanic carbon uptake) and deliberately altering the Earth's radiation balance (often called climate engineering, or solar radiation management). Research is beginning to provide insights into the potential for taking actions over and above mitigation and adaptation to slow or even offset the changes in climate and the environment being induced by human activities. Issues of technological feasibility are also largely unexplored. Papers are invited that describe and address the potential effectiveness and scientific and technical problems associated with geoengineering. Possible examples include the potential for enhancement of carbon sinks, modeling studies of the climatic impacts of proposed schemes for altering the absorption of solar radiation; studies of

unintended environmental consequences; and evaluations of technological feasibility issues. This symposium is a follow-up to the Union symposium U7 with the same title. The symposium is open to general (oral/poster) contributions.

go to top of the page


JP4 Satellite Oceanography and Climatology (IAPSO, IAG)

Convener: Andrey Kostianoy, Moscow, Russia (IAPSO)

Co-conveners: Stefano Vignudelli, Pisa, Italy (IAPSO); Jérôme Benveniste, Frascati, Italy (IAPSO); Steve Nerem, Boulder, USA (IAG)

Description

Satellites are crucial for studying, monitoring, and forecasting the ocean environment and climate change. For decades, a variety of sensors have been providing frequent and repetitive measurements from the open ocean up to the coasts of the Oceans and are currently continuing their observations with a stronger and stronger commitment to supply data in an operational manner for ocean services, as well as scientific research and development to further improve Ocean observation capabilities. The aim of this symposium is to foster the use of the past and new data from space in the wider ocean and climate science communities. We invite contributions on all oceanographic and climate aspect associated with the usage of satellite observations in combination with other in situ data and modelling tools in the World Ocean, coastal and inland seas. Potential topics include: SST, ocean color, sea level and ocean circulation variability on all space and time scales, tides, equatorial and planetary waves, El Niño and other basin scale oscillation, ocean biochemistry, air and sea-ice interface with the ocean, oil pollution, regional and global climatology. Research results synergistically using in situ data, models and satellite data are most welcome, as well as research at the forefront of preparing for the next generation of satellite observations.
More related contributions will be presented in the following symposia:
  U10 Sea Level Change and Variability: Past, Present and Future
  JP1 Sea Level Change and Variability: Past, Present and Future
  JC1 Sea Ice in the Arctic and Southern Oceans
  JC2 Impact of Climate Warming on High Latitude and High Altitude Hydro- and Cryosphere
  JM2 Climate and Earth Systems Modelling

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Frank Shillington (Rondebosch, South Africa), Jean-Louis Fellous (Paris, France)

go to top of the page


JP5 Tsunamis (IAPSO, IASPEI)

Convener: Vasily Titov, Seattle, USA (IAPSO)

Co-conveners: Alexander Rabinovich, Moscow, Russia (IASPEI); Stefano Tinti, Bologna, Italy (IAPSO)

Description

Ten years ago, on December 26, 2004, the Sumatra tsunami killed over 230,000 people in 5 nations in a matter of few hours. This was a watershed event for the tsunami science, for the global tsunami awareness and for the tsunami warning operations. The impact of a single tsunami, followed by the outpouring of assistance from most nations of the world, will forever live in the memory of those who suffered and those who witnessed the aftermath of this horrific disaster. The decade that followed this tragic event reinforced all too clearly the need for building tsunami resilient society. Over 20 damaging tsunamis have occurred since 2004, with several trans-ocean catastrophic events killing tens of thousands of people. The deadly sequence included the costliest tsunami of all times, the Great Japan tsunami of March 11, 2011. The science of tsunamis has seen unprecedented advances during the decade, fuelled by wealth of tsunami observation data from surveys and new detection capabilities. Scientific methods are now being adopted into upcoming tsunami warning systems and forecast capabilities around the world with unprecedented rate. The IUGG symposium is an opportunity to summarize and review the advances in tsunami science, its connection to operational warning and its input into building tsunami-resilient society. The scientific and technical sessions will focus on advances in tsunami research and resilience since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. All aspects of tsunamis from generation to inundation, from assessment to mitigation, and from engineering to decision making, will be considered including tsunami warning technologies.

This symposium is linked with the Union Symposium U2 Integrated Disaster Risk Science: Accounting for Extremes.

go to top of the page


JP6 Acoustical Oceanography (IAPSO, IASPEI)

Convener: Silvia Blanc, Buenos Aires, Argentina (IAPSO)

Co-conveners: Johannes Schweitzer, Kjeller, Norway (IASPEI)

Description

This symposium encourages oceanographers, acousticians and seismologists to present contributions with new results of research on topics related to acoustical oceanography in the broadest sense. Hydroacoustic waves are remarkable means of exploring ocean properties due to their ability to travel over long distances in the water with relatively low loss in energy, particularly within the SOFAR channel. They may be recorded with underwater sensors or as seismic waves on land following conversion at the shoreline. Organizers encourage the submission of abstracts covering all major topics on hydroacoustics, including: underwater sound propagation - measurements and modelling-; investigation of T-waves to understand submarine earthquake processes, to locate these earthquakes and to understand different oceanic processes such as internal waves and ice floes and icebergs; acoustic signal processing; fisheries acoustics; updated-measurement techniques; remote sensing applications; target modelling; volume reverberation; simulated, laboratory and at-sea experiments to evaluate acoustic parameters; geoacoustics and sediment characterization. The symposium will provide an excellent opportunity for students and young researchers as well as experienced ones to increase communication among scientists coming from different disciplines, enabling the exchange of relevant advances.

This symposium is related to the Union Symposium U8 “Geo-Monitoring in the 21st Century”.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Guust Nolet (Valbonne, France), Peter Worcester (San Diego, USA), Walter Munk (San Diego, USA)

go to top of the page


JS1 Planetary Physics (IASPEI, IACS)

Convener: Tilman Spohn, Berlin, Germany (IASPEI)

Co-conveners: Ralf Greve, Sapporo, Japan (IACS), Michael Purucker, Greenbelt, USA (IAGA/SEDI)

Description

Recent space missions to the terrestrial planets and the giant planets and their moons have significantly deepened our understanding of the interiors of planets. Measurements of the gravity and magnetic fields and the planetary figures have been used to improve on models of the interior structure and the magnetic fields. Imaging and spectroscopic data have been used to constrain models of the formation of the planets, their geological evolution and - for some - their habitability. Laboratory studies have provided insight into rheological properties of the interiors and relevant phase diagrams. Modeling of processes occurring in planetary interiors has become increasingly detailed and has opened many new doors for an understanding of planetary evolution including models that investigate possible feedbacks between planetary evolution and life. New missions under development at the present time promise even better geophysical data such as accurate figures and gravity fields for e.g., Mercury and seismic and heat flow data for Mars. The present symposium invites contributions from all walks of Planetary Geodesy and Geophysics to arrive at an integrated view of planetary evolution. There will be invited talks but open contributions are solicited.

The symposium is linked to the Union Symposium U5 New Discoveries in Deep Interior of the Earth and Planets.

go to top of the page


JS2 Physics and Chemistry of Earth and Planetary Interiors with Implications for their Structure, Process and Evolution (IASPEI, IAVCEI, IAGA, SEDI, IACS)

Convener: Jiuhua Chen, Miami, USA (IASPEI)

Co-conveners: Ian Jackson, Canberra, Australia (IASPEI); Sergio Speziale, Potsdam, Germany (IASPEI); Tomo Katsura, Bayreuth, Germany (IAVCEI); Joshua Feinberg, Minneapolis, USA (IAGA); Catherine McCammon, Bayreuth, Germany (IAVCEI); Anne Pommier, Tempe, USA (IAGA)

Description

Advances in understanding the structure and evolution of the Earth’s interior typically involve a combination of insights from field-based observations, the laboratory, and modeling. An interdisciplinary symposium is planned, involving new results from seismological and electrical sounding of the structure of the mantle and core (including discontinuities, anisotropy and attenuation), observations of the Earth's magnetic field and its relationship to planetary heat-flow, related earth materials research (including phase equilibria, element partitioning, deformation and the development of texture, and the influence of volatiles on partial melting, seismic and electrical properties, and rheology), and numerical modeling of properties and processes on scales ranging from the atomic to geodynamic, and from accretion and core formation to the present.

The symposium is linked to the Union Symposium U5 New Discoveries in Deep Interior of the Earth and Planet.

go to top of the page


JS3 Geophysical Imaging of Natural Resources (IASPEI, IAG, IAGA, SEG)

Convener: Michele Pipan, Trieste, Italy (IASPEI)

Co-conveners: Charles Toth, Columbus, USA (IAG); Carmen Gaina, Oslo, Norway (IAGA); Remke Van Dam, East Lansing, USA (SEG)

Description

Access to underground natural resources is a crucial issue in a world that is rapidly depleting known natural reservoirs to sustain social and economic development and, in a longer-term perspective, for the basic survival of an ever increasing global population. Geophysics is the discipline that can provide the necessary information to identify, evaluate and exploit buried natural resources. To date, a large part of geophysical developments and activities has concentrated on hydrocarbon and mineral exploration and exploitation. However, the focus is now changing and water and natural heat sources are becoming increasingly important. Regardless of the actual nature of the buried resources, geophysical methods have been greatly improved and newly developed theoretical, methodological and technological tools allow today highly accurate subsurface imaging and characterization. At the same time, these tools are useful for deciphering the local and regional tectonic setting, and therefore help to better understand the formation and evolution of natural resources. Consequently, these methods can be also used as predictive tools.
This symposium will focus on the state of the art geophysical developments and applications to image and characterize underground natural resources.
Theoretical studies, methodological developments, and applications to synthetic and field cases are welcome. A non-exhaustive list of topics includes:
 - Theoretical and lab studies, including numerical simulation;
 - Airborne, land and waterborne surveys: instruments, data acquisition/processing, interpretation;
 - Geophysics for the optimum exploitation of natural resources, also in connection with modeling of the reservoirs for enhanced extraction planning;
 - Geophysics to monitor secondary effects of exploitation activities, such as aquifer interactions and microtremors.
 - Geophysics as a predictive tool for discovering natural resources
Contributions showing strong interaction with remote sensing, tectonics and structural geology are strongly encouraged.

go to top of the page


JS4 Deformation of the Lithosphere: Integrating Seismology and Geodesy through Modelling (IASPEI, IAG)

Convener: Kevin Furlong, University Park, USA (IASPEI)

Co-conveners: Jeff Freymueller, Fairbanks, USA (IAG)

Description

The past decade has witnessed significant advances in our capabilities to observe lithospheric deformation on a range of spatial and temporal scales. Improved tools for imaging earthquake rupture processes, and the combination of densified, continuous GPS (cGPS) networks with space-based and airborne direct observations of crustal deformation such as InSAR and LiDAR have led to substantial improvements in our understanding of lithospheric deformational processes. In this symposium we invite submissions reporting research involving the acquisition and analyses of seismologic and geodetic data, and the utilization of those data through modeling to map and quantify rates and patterns of lithospheric deformation. Of particular interest are (1) studies that integrate data sets and data types, (2) modeling of processes that span temporal ranges including the earthquake cycle and subsequent rupture, and (3) longer term processes that permanently deform the lithosphere.

go to top of the page


JS5 Glacier, Ice Sheet and Snow Seismology (IASPEI, IACS)

Convener: Fabian Walter, Grenoble, France (IASPEI)

Co-conveners: Olaf Eisen, Bremerhaven, Germany (IACS); Alec van Herwijnen, Davos, Switzerland (IACS); Paul Winberry, Ellensburg, USA (IACS)

Description

Seismic signals carry information about their sources and the medium through which they travel. This makes seismology an ideally suited approach for the study of dislocation processes and geologic structures at all depths within the Earth. With constant advances in sensor technology, data storage capacities and computational power, more areas in geophysics are benefitting from the recording and analysis of seismic waves. In cryospheric sciences, seismic techniques are also playing a growing role. While instrumentation has to meet high standards for deployment in rugged and highly inaccessible environments, seismology has allowed for unprecedented insights into glacier and ice sheet dynamics.
In this session we address recent developments in active and passive seismology in polar and glaciated regions. This subject embraces seismic measurements on or near glaciers, ice sheets, ice streams, icebergs, sea ice, and within snow or firn layers. We welcome the presentation of new scientific results as well as innovative analysis and instrumentation tools. The list of potential topics includes (but is not limited to) basal processes, subglacial and englacial hydraulics, iceberg calving, sea ice properties, crevassing, and internal layer imaging.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Emma Surinach (Barcelona, Spain)

go to top of the page


JS6 Array Techniques for Monitoring the State of the Earth (IASPEI, IAPSO, IAGA)

Convener: Johannes Schweitzer, Kjeller, Norway (IASPEI)

Co-conveners: Silvia Blanc, Buenos Aires, Argentina (IAPSO); Keith D. Koper, Salt Lake City, USA (IASPEI); Satheesh Shenoi, Hyderabad, India (IAPSO); Gary Egbert, Corvallis, USA (IAGA)

Description

Array techniques are widely used tools to analyze data in many different research fields. Common to these different array types is the recording of a wavefield at many array sites and then the common analysis of these data. Applying array techniques improves the signal-to-noise ratio so that smaller signals can be observed compared to single sensors. Arrays can additionally provide information about propagation characteristics of these observations (velocity and direction). Many arrays run autonomously and provide information about their observations in near-real time.
Seismometer arrays are used to locate seismic sources and to study their characteristics as well as the structure of the Earth. Seismic arrays build the backbone of the International Monitoring System of the CTBTO. Hydrophone arrays are used to locate and investigate source and propagation of acoustic signals in the oceans. Infrasound arrays record the wide range of acoustic phenomena in the atmosphere. Arrays of magnetometers are used to investigate Earth resistivity, and to map external source current systems.
Ocean-bottom seismometers record hydro-acoustic signals, while land-based seismometers can also record infrasound signals. Seismic signals are also recorded on hydrophones and infrasound sensors.
All contributions applying array techniques are welcome, in particular we invite presentations with the following topics:
 - Synergy by joint analysis of data from arrays recording different wavefield types;
 - New theoretical approaches in analysis of array data;
 - Monitoring capabilities of array networks covering wide geographic areas;
 - Applications of ocean-bottom-mounted hydrophone arrays for measurement of ocean temperatures or for tracking marine mammals;
 - Arrays to investigate the Earth's deep interior by installation of a "Global Array of Broadband Arrays (GABBA)";
 - Analysis of geoelectromagnetic array data, both for solid Earth and space physics studies.

This symposium is related to the Union Symposium U8 Geo-Monitoring in the 21st Century.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

David B. Harris (Maupin, OR, USA), Ari Viljanen (Helsinki, Finland), Michael McPhaden (Seattle, USA)

go to top of the page


JV1 Extreme Geological Events (IAVCEI, IAGA, IASPEI)

Convener: Steve Self, Milton Keynes, U.K. (IAVCEI)

Co-conveners: Ciaran Beggan, Edinburgh, U.K. (IAGA); David Jackson, Los Angeles, USA (IASPEI)

Description

This symposium will focus on the risks from extreme geologic events such as giant volcanic eruptions, large magnitude earthquakes, space weather, rapid magnetic field change, and landslides. Some issues common to the geologic hazards that link them are (1) they frequently occur together; (2) they all have statistical distributions, with many more small ones than large ones, (3) they leave geological fingerprints, (4) they all have unknown upper limits on their size, and (5) there is some question about whether the largest "extreme" events are in some sense distributed differently from the smaller ones, or whether they are just in the tails of the same size distributions. We encourage participants to present research results on aspects of these five issues, either for single hazards or for geologic hazards as a group. This might include methods of estimating the probability of extreme events, determination and quantification of impacts, or analysis of past events.
Earthquakes may be different from the others in that there is a well-agreed measure of size, the "moment magnitude", that can be measured accurately and remotely and linked with a geological moment rate; and that the locations are perhaps distributed more widely than those for volcanoes and landslides. Thus monitoring for earthquakes may present special challenges. Space weather is a geologically recent hazard to which our exposure has grown with advances in technology. There is little direct experience of the potential extremes and impacts.
We welcome presentations that focus attention on the shared features of the risks presented by extreme geologic hazards.

The JV1 symposium is related to the IUGG Union Symposium U2 “Integrated Disaster Risk Science: Accounting for Extremes”. As such, JV1 will also focus on risks, which in all hazards means both exposure and vulnerability.

go to top of the page


JV3 Geophysical Imaging and Monitoring of Volcanoes (IAVCEI, IASPEI, IAGA, IAPSO)

Convener: Jacques Zlotnicki, Clermont Ferrand, France (IAVCEI)

Co-conveners: Yoichi Sasai, Shizuoka, Japan (IAGA); Malcolm Johnston, Menlo Park, USA (IASPEI); Gilda Currenti, Catania, Italy (IAVCEI); Boris Levin, Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, Russia (IAPSO)

Description

Major research has been accomplished during the last few years on understanding the plumbing system of volcanoes, the interactions between magma supply, hydrothermal system and fluids transfer, and the geological setting in the regional tectonics. In parallel, outstanding multi-parameter land-base and satellite observations focused on for monitoring active volcanoes in almost real time have been obtained. The symposium will emphasize these findings through the following fields:
 - Ground to Satellites Observations for imaging, monitoring and risk evaluation of active volcanoes and geothermal fields;
 - Tomography of volcanoes and geothermal fields from the ground surface to magma source, based on electromagnetic and other geophysical methods;
 - Joint Electromagnetic, geochemical, thermal, ground deformation and seismic observations for detecting sources of pressure and instabilities;
 - Laboratory experiments for the determination of physical processes leading to eruptive and geothermal activities;
 - Multi-parameter methods for monitoring volcanoes and geothermal fields based on land and satellite observations;
 - Risk evaluation and eruptive scenarios, Information and communication.

go to top of the page

  

 

* Note for JH1, HS1 & HS2 Symposia

The papers presented during IAHS organized symposia JH1, HS1 and HS2 will be published as volumes of the online open-access journal, Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (PIAHS) that continues the IAHS Red Book series. Authors will be informed before 5 December 2014 whether a full paper is required and how to submit. Full papers will be due by 19 January 2015. Publication will cost €120 per 6-page paper; additional pages will be charged at €35 per page (prices net tax).

 

   
 
 
print page
IUGG 2015 Prague Secretariat: C-IN, 5. kvetna 65, 140 21 Prague 4, CZE | tel.: +420 261 174 301 | fax: +420 261 174 307
Copyright © 2013 iugg2015prague.com | Powered and created by E-WORKS - web studio | XHTML 1.0 | CSS 2